Tag Archive for: Nexxice

Nexxice senior synchronized skating team in China for 2016 ISU Shanghai Trophy

OTTAWA, ON:  Canada will have one team competing at the 2016 ISU Shanghai Trophy in Shanghai, China. Nexxice senior will be the Canadian entry at the international synchronized skating invitational taking place from March 4-6, 2016.

Representing the Burlington Skating Centre are the 2016 Canadian silver medallists, Nexxice. They are the defending world champions, and have previously won the world championships in 2009, won silver from 2012-2014, and won bronze in 2007 and 2008. Nine-time consecutive Canadian champions (from 2007-2015), they are coached by Shelley Simonton Barnett and Anne Schelter.

Karen Robertson of Chelsea, Que., will be the sole Canadian official at the event.

For more information on the event please visit www.isu.org.

Skate Canada names teams for 2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships

OTTAWA, ON: Skate Canada has selected two synchronized skating teams for the 2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships taking place in Budapest, Hungary, from April 8-9, 2016.

Les Supremes

Les Suprêmes

Les Suprêmes, from the CPA Saint-Léonard, and Nexxice, from the Burlington Skating Centre, earned their entries to the world championships winning gold and silver respectively at 2016 Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships this past weekend in Waterloo, Ont.

Canadian champions Les Suprêmes are the first Canadian entry for the 2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships. Representing CPA Saint-Léonard, they earned their third Canadian title this past weekend in Waterloo, Ont. Les Suprêmes placed sixth at the 2015 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships. They have won one medal at this event previously, bronze in 2003. Les Suprêmes are coached by Marilyn Langlois, assisted by Pascal Denis, Amélie Brochu, and Amanda Gaiotti.

Nexxice Senior

Nexxice Senior

Representing the Burlington Skating Centre, Nexxice will be the second entry. Nexxice are the defending world champions, and have previously won the world championships in 2009, won silver from 2012-2014, and won bronze in 2007 and 2008. The 2016 Canadian silver medallists are coached by Shelley Simonton Barnett and Anne Schelter.

This will be the 17th edition of the ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships with Canada having won medals at 11 of those previous events.

Earlier this season, entries for the 2016 ISU Synchronized Skating Junior World Challenge Cup in Zagreb, Croatia, from March 11-12, 2016, were determined at Skate Canada Central Ontario’s annual Winterfest competition. The 2016 Canadian silver medallists Les Suprêmes (junior) from CPA Saint-Léonard and 2016 Canadian gold medallists, Nexxice (junior), of the Burlington Skating Club earned the two entries for Canada.

Les Suprêmes ends nine-year run for NEXXICE at Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships

WATERLOO, Ont. – NEXXICE’s nine-year winning streak at the Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships is over.

Quebec’s Les Suprêmes, who led the reigning world champions by almost five points following Saturday’s short program, scored 143.19 in their free program Sunday for a two-day total of 217.42. NEXXICE finished second with 212.59, and Central Ontario’s Meraki (171.23) earned bronze.

It is the third Canadian title for Les Suprêmes, and first since 2004.

Both Les Suprêmes and NEXXICE qualify for the 2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships being held April 8-9 in Budapest, Hungary. Last year at the world championships in Hamilton, Ont., NEXXICE claimed their second world crown while Les Suprêmes placed sixth.

“We’ve worked very hard for this,” said Les Suprêmes coach Pascal Denis. “NEXXICE is a team that was (at the top) for many years.

“We had two great skates. They skated well both days, so we’re very happy about that.”

“It feels amazing,” said Les Suprêmes co-captain Claudia Sforzin. “Our goal was to lay out two strong performances and focus on the things we can control. The result is just a bonus. It’s surreal.”

“We were both really happy with our performances,” added Laurie Desilets, the team’s other captain. “It’s just an incredible feeling.”

NEXXICE’s run of nine straight titles began in 2007 and two years later they became the first Canadian team to win the World Synchronized Skating Championships. On Saturday, that 2009 team was the first synchronized skating team inducted into the Skate Canada Hall of Fame.

A day later, their record run was halted.

“The short program was not good, and it put us at a considerable disadvantage,” admitted NEXXICE coach Shelley Simonton Barnett.

“It was disappointing. The free was much stronger. It’s a very difficult program that’s developing, and there’s still more we can do with it.”

In the junior category, NEXXICE scored 168.00 to turn the tables and end Les Suprêmes’ own two-year national championship streak. Les Suprêmes’ (161.11) was second followed by Les Pirouettes (154.95).

Les Suprêmes went home with Novice gold with a total of 114.05 points, edging   NEXXICE (111.89) and Les Pirouettes (102.52).

Quebec-based teams ended up taking home gold in four of the five events in Waterloo.

On Saturday, NOVA claimed their sixth straight national Open title while Cassiopée were crowned Intermediate champions.

Canada’s best synchronized skaters headed to Waterloo for 2016 Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships

OTTAWA, ON: Synchronized skating teams from across Canada are travelling to Waterloo, Ont., for the 2016 Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships, taking place from February 19-21, 2016, at the Waterloo Memorial Recreation Complex.

The event will host approximately 800 skaters and coaches on 40 teams competing for national titles in the senior, junior, open, intermediate and novice categories. The top two senior teams will represent Canada at the 2016 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships being held in Budapest, Hungary from April 8-9, 2016.

“We are eagerly looking forward to seeing Canada’s top synchronized skating teams performing on our nation’s biggest stage in Waterloo at the Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships,” said Dan Thompson, CEO Skate Canada. “Canadians have always been innovators in synchronized skating, and we have no doubt that this event will once again show how this discipline is flourishing in our country.”

Skate Canada will also be celebrating many accomplishments in the synchronized skating community with two inductions to the Skate Canada Hall of Fame. On Friday, February 19, Cathy Dalton will be inducted to the Hall of Fame in the builder category, and on Saturday, February 20, history will be made as the 2009 NEXXICE senior team becomes the first synchronized skating team to be inducted into the Skate Canada Hall of Fame, entering in the athlete category.

Skate Canada is proud to host nearly 500 students from local area schools on Friday, February 19 from 9:15 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. The Skate Canada School Program allows local area schools to come and watch synchronized skating live for free. Students are encouraged to get creative by making handmade posters to cheer on the skaters.

The following schools will be taking part in the Skate Canada School Program:

  • Baden Public School
  • Westmount Public School
  • Our Lady of Lourdes
  • R. Kaufman Public School

Tickets are available for purchase through the Waterloo Memorial Recreation Complex box office, which is open Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Three-day passes can be purchased for $46.50 for adults or $24 for children, and individual day passes can be purchased for $20 for adults or $10 for children. Entry is free for children five years and younger.

Year-end recap: Synchro

NEXXICE was on top of the world in 2015.

With the eyes of the synchro world on Hamilton, Ont., in April for the ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships, the Burlington, Ont. based powerhouse, competing just a few kilometres from their home base, thrilled a raucous hometown crowd with a nail-biting win for their first world title in six years.

Nexxice on the podium.

NEXXICE

With an electric atmosphere inside the FirstOntario Centre, NEXXICE dethroned defending champion Marigold Ice Unity of Finland by a miniscule .67 of a point. Russia’s Team Paradise took bronze, that country’s first medal in the history of the world championships.

Quebec’s Les Suprêmes, Canadian silver medallists, finished sixth.

Les Supremes. 2015

Les Suprêmes

Earlier in the season, NEXXICE claimed the Trophy d’Ecosse in Scotland while Les Suprêmes won the Mozart Cup in Austria. Days later, NEXXICE Senior took gold at the Spring Cup in Italy, and the NEXXICE junior squad claimed silver at the same event.

Weeks before the World Championships, Canada’s best synchro teams met in Quebec City for the Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships. NEXXICE won their ninth consecutive senior crown and Les Suprêmes took the junior title before going on to win bronze at the ISU world junior championships.

Other teams to leave Quebec City with gold were NOVA (Open), Évolution (Intermediate) and Les Suprêmes (Novice).

Coming up tomorrow: Men’s, Women’s, Pair and Ice Dance (July to December)

Weaver and Poje repeat as Grand Prix Final champions

BARCELONA – For the second year in a row, ice dancers Kaitlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje of Waterloo, Ont., won the gold medal at the ISU Grand Prix Final figure skating competition.

The Canadians produced 182.66 points on Saturday, a mere 0.27 off their personal best set last season. Madison Chock and Evan Bates of the U.S. were second at 177.55 and Anna Cappellini and Luca Lanotte of Italy third at 176.37.

It was the sixth straight victory for Weaver and Poje on the circuit over the past two seasons.

‘’We felt great about the performance today,’’ said Poje. ‘We improved upon our other Grand Prix showings this season. We didn’t perfect everything we wanted to, so there is still work to be done.’’

Weaver was also delighted with the performance.

‘’We felt in the zone,’’ she said. ‘’We injected some emotion into this program and skated with our hearts out there. That is the most rewarding experience you can get. I can’t believe we won this event again, it hasn’t sunk in yet.’’

In men’s competition, Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan gave another interstellar performance raising his world record score to 330.43 points. Javier Fernandez of Spain was second at 292.95 and Shoma Uno of Japan third at 276.79. Three-time world champion Patrick Chan of Toronto climbed from sixth after the short to fourth  with the third best long program for 264.45 points.

‘’I was really scared and nervous,’’ said Chan, who sat out last season. ‘’I’ve had shaky practices this week. But my free program is very comfortable and once the music starts it’s almost like auto-pilot. It shows my training is going really well and I can rely on it.’’

Synchronized skating made its debut at the Grand Prix Final and world champions Nexxice from Burlington, Ont., won the bronze medal with 120.34 points. Team Paradise from Russia took the gold at 131.09 and Team Rockettes from Finland were second at 127.66.

The 18  Nexxice skaters were Shannon Aikman-Jones, Cassandra Ablack, Ellicia Beaudoin, Kelly Britten, Anna Cappuccitti, Alessia Chiovitti, Lee Chandler, Samantha Defino, Courtney Gray, Celina Hevesi, Victoria Kwan, Renata Khuzina, Lauren Malott, Courtney McNaughton, Lisa Miadovnik, Rachel Ng, Kiesten Tietz and Jillian Tyler.

‘’It’s just incredible to be here,’’ said Defino. ‘’We just loved skating out and seeing that crowd. We were very pleased with our skate. This is very early in the season for us to be performing our free program and to get a medal was a success.’’

Canada ends the competition with three medals – one of each colour. On Friday, Meagan Duhamel of Lively, Ont., and Eric Radford of Balmertown, Ont., took silver in pairs.

Full results: http://www.isuresults.com/results/season1516/gpchn2015/index.htm

 

Canadian Skaters in Barcelona for ISU Grand Prix Final

OTTAWA, ON: Skate Canada will have five entries at the 2015 ISU Senior Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Barcelona, Spain, taking place from December 9-13, 2015. Canada will have one entry in men’s, two entries in pair, one entry in ice dance and one entry in synchronized skating.

The ISU Senior Grand Prix Final is the concluding event of the ISU Senior Grand Prix of Figure Skating circuit. The series hosts six stops: United States (Skate America), Canada (Skate Canada International), China (Cup of China), France (Trophée Eric Bompard), Russia (Rostelecom Cup), and Japan (NHK Trophy). Skaters are awarded points based on their placements at their assigned two events and the top six in each of the four disciplines advance to the Final.

In senior, Canada will be represented by Patrick Chan, 24, Toronto, Ont., in men’s, Meagan Duhamel, 30, Lively, Ont., and Eric Radford, 30, Balmertown, Ont., and Julianne Séguin, 19, Longueuil, Que., and Charlie Bilodeau, 22, Trois-Pistoles, Que., in the pair category, as well as Kaitlyn Weaver, 26, Toronto, Ont., and Andrew Poje, 28, Waterloo, Ont., in ice dance.

For the first time in the event’s history, the ISU Senior Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final will also include synchronized skating. One entry was assigned to each of the top five ranked ISU members in synchronized skating; Canada being represented by Nexxice. The synchronized skating competition will consist of free skating, which will take place on Saturday, December 12, 2015. The teams will not perform a short program.

Earlier this season, Canada qualified one entry, Roman Sadovsky, 16, Vaughan, Ont., to the ISU Junior Grand Prix Final, also taking place in Barcelona, Spain from December 9-13, 2015. Similar to the senior qualification, juniors are assigned two events on the seven-event series, with the top six in each category advancing to the Final.

ISU Senior Grand Prix Final

Three-time World Champion and double Olympic silver medallist (men’s and team) Patrick Chan, 24, Toronto, Ont., will represent Canada in men’s. Chan won gold at Skate Canada International and placed fifth in the short program at Trophée Éric Bompard to earn a berth at the ISU Grand Prix Final. The representative of the Granite Club has previously competed at this event six times, medalling four times and winning gold on two occasions (2010 and 2011). He is coached by Kathy Johnson and trains at the Detroit Skating Club.

World champions and Olympic silver medallists (team) Meagan Duhamel, 30, Lively, Ont., and Eric Radford, 30, Balmertown, Ont., are the first of two Canadian pair entries. The representatives of CPA Saint-Léonard have previously competed at this event four times and are the defending champions. This season on the grand prix circuit, they won gold at Skate Canada International and at the NHK Trophy, qualifying in first place for this competition. Duhamel and Radford are coached by Richard Gauthier, Bruno Marcotte, and Sylvie Fullum.

Julianne Séguin, 19, Longueuil, Que., and Charlie Bilodeau, 22, Trois-Pistoles, Que., are the second Canadian pair entry at the event. Last year, they won gold at the ISU Junior Grand Prix Final; this will be their first time competing in this event at the senior level. The representatives of CPA Longueuil and CPA Chambly won bronze at Skate America and placed third in the short program at the Trophée Éric Bompard to qualify for this competition. Séguin and Bilodeau are coached by Josée Picard in Chambly, Que.

Nexxice.

Nexxice

Two time world medallists Kaitlyn Weaver, 26, Toronto, Ont., and Andrew Poje, 28, Waterloo, Ont., will be the Canadian entry in ice dance. This will be their fifth time competing at this event and they are the defending champions. Weaver and Poje won gold at Skate Canada International and the Rostelecom Cup to qualify first for this competition. The representatives of Sault FSC and Kitchener-Waterloo SC are coached by Angelika Krylova, Pasquale Camerlengo and Shae-Lynn Bourne in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

Two-time world champions, Nexxice, will be the Canadian entry in synchronized skating. The nine-time consecutive Canadian champions most recently won the 2015 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships. Representing the Burlington Skating Centre, Nexxice is coached by Shelley Simonton Barnett and Anne Schelter.

ISU Junior Grand Prix Final

Roman Sadovsky Junior Grand Prix gold.

Roman Sadovsky

Roman Sadovsky, 16, Vaughan, Ont., will be Canada’s sole entry in men’s. Earlier this season, he won gold at the ISU Junior Grand Prix in Slovakia and bronze at the ISU Junior Grand Prix in Poland. Last season he placed fifth at this event. Sadovsky is coached by Tracey Wainman at the YSRA Winter Club.

Mike Slipchuk, Skate Canada High Performance Director, will be the Canadian team leader at the event. Dr. Ghislaine Robert of Montreal, Que., and physiotherapist Agnes Makowski of Toronto, Ont., will be the Canadian medical staff onsite. Diane Kamagianis of Mission, Ont., Leanna Caron of Timmins, Ont., and Jeff Lukasik of Calgary, Alta., will be the Canadian officials at the event.

Emma Bowie, Skate Canada Communications Manager, will be the media contact at the event. To arrange onsite interviews please contact her by email at [email protected].

For results and full entries please visit www.isu.org.

 

 

 

CANADIAN ENTRIES AT THE 2015 ISU SENIOR GRAND PRIX FINAL

Discipline Name Age Hometown Club Coach
Mens Patrick Chan 24 Toronto, Ont. Granite Club Kathy Johnson
Pair Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford 30/30 Lively, Ont. / Balmertown, Ont. CPA Saint-Léonard / CPA Saint-Léonard Richard Gauthier / Bruno Marcotte / Sylvie Fullum
Pair Julianne Séguin / Charlie Bilodeau 19/22 Longueuil, Que. / Trois-Pistoles, Que. CPA Longueuil / CPA Chambly Josée Picard
Ice Dance Kaitlyn Weaver / Andrew Poje 26/28 Toronto, Ont. / Waterloo, Ont. Sault FSC / Kitchener-Waterloo SC Angelika Krylova / Pasquale Camerlengo / Shae-Lynn Bourne
Synchronized Skating Nexxice N/A N/A Burlington Skating Centre Shelley Simonton Barnett / Anne Schelter

CANADIAN ENTRIES AT THE 2015 ISU JUNIOR GRAND PRIX FINAL

Discipline Name Age Hometown Club Coach
Mens Roman Sadovsky 16 Vaughan, Ont. YRSA Winter Club Tracey Wainman

Nexxice and Bezic in Synch

Noted choreographer Sandra Bezic went looking for a novel element for her Niagara skating show last January and struck the motherlode.

She discovered Nexxice.

“I knew they were good,” Bezic said. “But I didn’t realize how good they were until I stepped onto the ice with them.”

Right from the first blush, when Bezic was with them at their training base, the Appleby Skating Centre in Burlington, Ont., she was “blown away” – just by their stroking exercises.

Watching them do this 30-minute, Anne Schelter-led work, in formation, 16-strong? Goosebump worthy. Watching them win the world synchronized skating championships several months later at home, in their own neck of the wood, in front of a throng of screaming, red-shirted, flag-waving people? Priceless.

Bezic was in the audience for the free skate, a spellbinding routine to “Rhapsody in Blue.” Dressed in black from head to toe, with the light sparkling subtly from their smoky shirts, a flip of deep cobalt blue kicking up from skirts as they moved, Nexxice finally executed the complex routine the way they wanted to all season. And now the world knows who they are, too: world champions of the highest order.

Their performance at the world event in Hamilton, Ont., in mid-April is perhaps a watershed moment not only for Nexxice, but for the synchronized skating world in general as it waits breathlessly for the International Olympic Committee to vote on its inclusion in July.

“I think we are maturing,” said Nexxice coach Shelley Barnett. “Our sport is maturing. We’ve been knocking on the door for a long time. But I also think we are getting more respect from other skating disciplines. That is something I didn’t see before, certainly not after 2007.”

Barnett was speaking of the year that the world championships last came to Canada in 2007, when the team finally won its first medal (bronze), in London, Ont. It was noisy there, too. But what happened in Hamilton was beyond compare.

People who had never watched synchro skating before tuned in. So did many of Canada’s elite mainstream skaters. Barnett noticed increased turnout for their team tryouts, and also registration for youth and beginner programs has tripled since the world championships. “Many of the younger skaters had never seen anything like this at this level,” she said. “And there is more enthusiasm and interest from parents who maybe didn’t quite get the full picture of what the sport could do for their children.”

Yes, Nexxice won, but it was the way they did it that sends shivers to the bone. Barnett said Schelter created choreography for the free skate that was complicated and required nuances of expression. “It had so many complexities and intricacies in the music that had to be brought out,” Barnett said. ”The team was challenged all year to find those nuances and to be able to control their movement enough to music.”

They wanted something challenging for the team, because Nexxice members were strong skaters, and the core of the team had been together at least five years. “They were capable of handling quite a bit,” Barnett said.

Bezic, known as the choreographer for folk like Barbara Underhill and Paul Martini, Brian Boitano, Kristi Yamaguchi, Kurt Browning, Tara Lipinski, Chen Lu and for years, Stars on Ice tours, went looking for Nexxice because she wanted local talent for her new Niagara ice show. She also wanted to mix things up in the show, putting new skaters with legends (Nam Nguyen and Kurt Browning), and mainstream skaters with synchro.

But when Bezic actually started to work with Nexxice, she was stunned by their skating ability. ”Their fundamentals are just unbelievable,” she said. “And their cohesiveness as a team, and their musicality, and their professionalism. They are in a class by themselves.”

In return for taking time away from a very important season for her show, Bezic returned to Burlington several times to help with Nexxice’s competitive programs. She saw the team work four or five hours at a time, with short breaks for ice-making, without a complaint.

“They are so respectful of the process,” she said. “They were completely delightful and fun and excited.” She found Schelter’s program composition so musical and it “made so much sense,” she said. “It was all balanced and beautiful and it had the restraint and sophistication and yet [the short program to MUD] was still fun.”

Bezic thinks Nexxice played a huge role in the success of her own show. “We never really get to see that calibre of skaters all together,” she said.

As for Nexxice, for the first time, at Bezic’s show, they felt a sense of inclusion. “It was really an honour to be recognized at the same level,” said Nexxice co-captain Lee Chandler, the lone male on the team. “We don’t have an Olympic sport yet, so to be recognized as elite athletes along with the big names like Kurt Browning and Tessa and Scott, it was really an honour.”

The two skating worlds traded stories about their experiences at rehearsals and the worlds collided with great cheer. Chandler heard Browning’s sage advice: to stay in the moment, to enjoy the training and the journey, to enjoy every single moment of the ups and downs through a long season.

The world synchro championships gave team members memories that will last them a lifetime. “It was kind of a whirlwind,” Chandler said. “That was probably the biggest crowd I’ve skated in, probably the most energetic crowd, in my skating career.”

The crowd, which numbered about 7,600 for their “Rhapsody In Blue” routine, started to scream as soon as Nexxice appeared from behind a curtain. They were on their feet, and waving the flags. “We were trying to stay as focused as we could,” Chandler said. “It was so loud. It was kind of just indescribable. The noise wasn’t really something that you heard. I was something that you felt. You could just feel the energy and the vibration right through the rink, when we were standing on the ice. It was an electric feeling.”

Then, they skated. “We worked countless hours to make sure that we did it justice and we skated it with maturity and poise,” Chandler said. “I think we can all be pretty proud. We went out and we owned it. We really didn’t hold back at all.”

Much of the team has committed to staying together for next season. Chandler says he’s finished, although he says if the IOC votes synchro skating in, he doesn’t want to close the door. He has a future as a coach and choreographer.

And it seems as if Bezic will never be the same again, like many, after having seen what a Canadian synchro team can do. “I felt like it was a shot in the arm for me to tag along,” she said.

Canada’s Nexxice crowned world champion in synchronized skating

HAMILTON – Nexxice from Burlington, Ont., won the gold medal for Canada on Saturday at the 20-country ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships held before an impressive and patriotic crowd of 7,600 at the FirstOntario Centre.

It is Canada’s first world crown since 2009 when Nexxice also took gold.

The top-seeded Canadian team finished with 214.73 points performing to Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. Finland won the free skate but added to their short program score Friday it wasn’t enough to catch the Canadians as they totalled 214.06. Russia won the bronze medal at 203.48.

Skating for Nexxice were Shannon Aikman-Jones, Maria Albanese, Ellicia Beaudoin, Emma Bonafiglia, Kelly Britten, Courtney Broadhurst, Lee Chandler, Alessia Chiovitti, Carla Coveart, Samantha Defino, Courtney Gray, Yu Hanamoto, Renata Khuzina, Victoria Kwan, Kristen Loritz, Nichole Manahan, Kerrin Caitlin McKinnon, Victoria Smith, Kiersten Tietz and Gillian Tyler.

‘’I don’t think it has sunk in that we are world champions,’’ said Lee Chandler. ‘’It was just a surreal experience with the crowd. In the end they really lifted us. This is a program we have been practicing since September and the girls came together today and performed it better than ever.’’

The second Canadian entry, les Suprêmes, from St-Léonard, Que., produced the fourth best free program to climb from seventh to sixth overall.

Skating for Les Suprêmes were: Elodie Marie Acheron, Audrey Bédard, Jessica Bernardo, Lou-Ann Bezeau-Tremblay, Joannie Brazeau, Sara Irma Corona, Alexandra Del Vecchio, Laurie Désilets, Jacqueline Hampshire, Maria-Victoria Langon, Clémence Léa Marduel, Agathe Sigrid Merlier, An-Kim Nguyen, Minh-Thu Tina Nguyen, Anne-Louise Normand, Geneviève Rougeau, Marina Rousseau, Laurra Olivia Sena, Claudia Sforzin and Yasuko Uchida.

‘’It was incredible, the crowd showed us so much love,’’ said Laura Désilets. ‘’We didn’t feel any added pressure being in Canada. We were really pleased with both our programs and we achieved our goals for this season.’’

This was the third time Canada has hosted the event in its 16 year history. Canada has now reached the podium in 11 of those 16 years.

Full results: 2015 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships

Burlington’s Nexxice first after short program at ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships

HAMILTON – Crowd favorites Nexxice from nearby Burlington, Ont., brought the house down Friday night at the FirstOntario Centre producing the top short program at the 20-country ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships.

Approximately 6,700 fans attended the event.

Nexxice, Canada’s top-ranked entry at the event, earned 71.06 points and are ahead of Finland in second at 70.39 and Sweden in third at 69.94. Skating to “MUD” by The Road Hammers Nexxice earned two level fours and three level threes in their performance..

Skating for Nexxice are Shannon Aikman-Jones, Maria Albanese, Ellicia Beaudoin, Emma Bonafiglia, Kelly Britten, Courtney Broadhurst, Lee Chandler, Alessia Chiovitti, Carla Coveart, Samantha Defino, Courtney Gray, Yu Hanamoto, Renata Khuzina, Victoria Kwan, Kristen Loritz, Nichole Manahan, Kerrin Caitlin McKinnon, Victoria Smith, Kiersten Tietz and Gillian Tyler.

‘’It was just electric out there, the crowd was fantastic,’’ said team member Kristen Loritz. We felt the energy as we stepped on the ice and carried with us until the finishing pass. We practice with simulated crowd noise all week and that helped the girls relax.’’

Nexxice are the nine-time consecutive Canadian champions and the only North American team to win the world championships (2009). They’ve won silver at the last three worlds.

Canada’s second entry, les Suprêmes from St-Léonard, Que., are in seventh spot. Skating for Les Suprêmes are: Elodie Marie Acheron, Audrey Bédard, Jessica Bernardo, Lou-Ann Bezeau-Tremblay, Joannie Brazeau, Sara Irma Corona, Alexandra Del Vecchio, Laurie Désilets, Jacqueline Hampshire, Maria-Victoria Langon, Clémence Léa Marduel, Agathe Sigrid Merlier, An-Kim Nguyen, Minh-Thu Tina Nguyen, Anne-Louise Normand, Geneviève Rougeau, Marina Rousseau, Laurra Olivia Sena, Claudia Sforzin and Yasuko Uchida.

Les Suprêmes have been runners-up at the past five nationals and were sixth at worlds in 2014.

This is the third time Canada has hosted the event in its 16 year history, with Canada having won medals at 10 of those previous events.

Full results: 2015 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships

Canada’s Nexxice wins gold and silver at Spring Cup

MILAN – Eight-time consecutive Canadian champions Nexxice from Burlington, Ont., collected its second consecutive gold medal this month on Sunday at the Spring Cup 2015 synchronized figure skating competition.

In senior level competition, Nexxice placed first in both the short and long programs for 208.81 points. Team Surprise from Sweden was second at 200.51 and Haydenettes from the U.S. third at 195.77.

The Nexxice team members were Shannon Aikman-Jones, Maria Albanese, Ellicia Beaudoin, Emma Bonafiglia, Kelly Britten, Courtney Broadhurst, Lee Chandler, Alessia Chiovitti, Carla Coveart, Samantha Defino, Courtney Gray, Yu Hanamoto, Renata-Delete Khuzina, Victoria Kwan, Kristen Loritz, Nichole Manahan, Kerrin Caitlin McKinnon, Victoria Smith, Kiersten Tietz, Gillian Tyler and Elizabeth Mayers.

Last season, the representatives of the Burlington Skating Club won silver at the 2014 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships and bronze at the 2014 Mozart Cup. The three-time consecutive world silver medallists are coached by Shelley Simonton Barnett and Anne Schelter.

In junior competition, Idel from Russia were the winners with 150.49 edging Nexxice in second at 148.60. Team Convivium from Sweden was third at 141.55.

The Nexxice junior squad members were Cassandra Ablack, Katelyn Blowe, Stephanie Collier, Alycia Giro, Celina Hevesi, Taylor Johnston, Caitlin Laskowski, Laura Lourenco, Caroline Marr, Emiko Marr, Carolyn Matheson, Jessica Morgan, Rachel Ng, Inka Sirkia, Johanna Smalen, Claudia Smith, Alessandra Toso, Kayla Walker, Erica White, Brooklyn Williamson.

The 2013 Canadian junior champions won this event in 2009. Last season, they placed fourth at the Mozart Cup, won silver at the 2014 Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships, and placed fifth at the ISU Junior World Challenge Cup. They are coached by Trish Perdue-Mills and represent the Burlington Skating Club.

Canadian team wins gold at synchronized skating competition

DUMFRIES, Scotland – Eight-time consecutive Canadian champions Nexxice from Burlington, Ont., overwhelmed the competition this weekend to win the gold medal at the Trophy d’Ecosse synchronized skating competition.

The Canadians totalled 202.69 points for the victory with Team Spirit from Wales second and Zariba from Scotland third.

The Nexxice team members were Shannon Aikman-Jones, Maria Albanese, Ellicia Beaudoin, Emma Bonafiglia, Kelly Britten, Courtney Broadhurst, Lee Chandler, Alessia Chiovitti, Carla Coveart, Samantha Defino, Courtney Gray, Yu Hanamoto, Renata-Delete Khuzina, Victoria Kwan, Kristen Loritz, Nichole Manahan, Kerrin Caitlin McKinnon, Victoria Smith, Kiersten Tietz, Gillian Tyler and Elizabeth Mayers.

Last season, the representatives of the Burlington Skating Club won silver at the 2014 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships and bronze at the 2014 Mozart Cup. The three-time consecutive world silver medallists are coached by Shelley Simonton Barnett and Anne Schelter.