WHO WE ARE

A not-for-profit organization, Skate Canada is the oldest and largest figure skating organization in the world and is recognized by the Government of Canada and the Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) as the governing body for the sport of figure skating in Canada. However, we go far beyond figure skating. As the largest learn-to-skate teaching organization in Canada, we are dedicated to creating a nation of skaters both recreationally and competitively.

Skate Canada

  • is designated by the ISU as the official sanctioning body of figure skating in Canada and oversees the rules and standards of the sport at the development, national and international levels of competition within Canada
  • is the largest skating instruction organization in Canada. Each year, our learn-to-skate and skill-development programs help more than 130,000 skaters hone their on-ice skills. Those skills can be applied to figure, hockey, ringette or speed skating, or to enjoy gliding on a frozen pond.
  • is comprised of 13 regional sections that are made up of over 1,200 skating clubs
  • Skate Canada has over 5,500 member coaches who are NCCP qualified and actively coaching all levels of long term athlete development. Owns and produces top-level skating competitions including: Skate Canada International, Canadian Tire National Skating Championships, Skate Canada Synchronized Skating Championships, Skate Canada Challenge, Autumn Classic International and Skate Canada Adult Championships.
  • provides performance and financial support to Canada’s Junior and Senior National Figure Skating Team athletes
  • has a registered membership of over 180,000
  • is supported by over 10,000 volunteers across our clubs and sections
  • qualifies and appoints judges, referees and other officials in the sport of figure skating.
  • has three National Performance Centres (Toronto, Calgary, Montreal) that focus on:
    • Training and instruction for skaters and coaches
    • Coach business and management development

Our History

The Amateur Skating Association of Canada was formed in 1887 and by 1914 a separate organization for figure skating had been established. This was known as the Figure Skating Department of the Amateur Skating Association of Canada and the initial members were Ottawa ‘s Minto Club and the Earl Grey Club in Montreal. The first official annual figure skating championships of Canada were held in the same year under the new organization.

Louis Rubenstein was the first president, a position he held until 1930. The department became known as the Canadian Figure Skating Association (CFSA) in 1939 and in 1947 the CFSA joined the International Skating Union and dropped its membership in the Amateur Skating Association of Canada. In 2000 the organization changed its name to Skate Canada.

In 1947 the CFSA national office was set up in Ottawa by Charles H. Cumming, the Association’s Secretary-Treasurer. The office was run on a volunteer basis until 1958 when Cumming became the first full-time employee of the CFSA.

1887 – Amateur Skating Association of Canada for speed and figure skating formed by Louis Rubenstein of Montreal

1890 – Louis Rubenstein competes at the first unofficial World Championships in St. Petersburg and places first in two of three departments.

1911 – First artificial ice rink built in Vancouver.

1914 – First official Canadian Figure Skating Championships held in Ottawa.

1914 – The Figure Skating Department of the Amateur Skating Association of Canada formed to promote skating in Canada.

1928 – First year Canadians participate at an ISU World Figure Skating Championships.

1930 – Cecil Smith is the first Canadian to place in top three at ISU World Figure Skating Championships (second place).

1932 – For the first time Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Montreal.

1939 – The Department renamed the Canadian Figure Skating Association (CFSA).

1945 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the first female to win the Lou Marsh Trophy, age 17.

1945 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the youngest competitor to win North American Championships, age 17.

1947 – The CFSA joins the International Skating Union and establishes a national office in Ottawa.

1947 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the first and only Canadian to win European title.

1948 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the first Canadian to win Olympic figure skating title.

1948 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the first North American to win European and Olympic titles in the same year.

1948 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the first Canadian to win back-to-back world championship titles (1947, 1948).

1948 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) is the first athlete to win the Lou Marsh Trophy three times (1945, 1947, 1948).

1948 – Barbara Ann Scott (King) wins Senior Canadian, European, World and Olympic titles, becoming the first North American to win all three in the same year, the first Canadian figure skater to win an Olympic gold medal and the first to win back-to-back World titles.

1948 – Suzanne Morrow and Wallace Distelmeyer perform first death spiral at international competition in its present-day low position at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Davos, Switzerland.

1951 – Suzanne Morrow is the first woman in the history of Canadian figure skating to win national senior championship titles in all three disciplines (1947, 1948 – Pair; 1948 – Ice Dance; 1949-1951 – Singles)

1954 – Frances Dafoe and Norris Bowden are the first Canadian pair to win the ISU World Figure Skating Championships.

1958 – Charles H. Cumming hired as the CFSA’s first full-time employee.

1960 – Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Vancouver, BC.

1960 – Barbara Wagner and Robert Paul have won the most world championships titles by a Canada pair team (1957-1960).

1960 – Barbara Wagner and Robert Paul are the first Canadian pair to win gold at the Olympic Winter Games.

1962 – Petra Burka is the first woman to complete a triple Salchow at a Canadian Championships.

1962 – Donald Jackson performs the first triple Lutz in competition at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Prague Czechoslovakia.

1963 – First CFSA logo developed.

1963 – Donald McPherson becomes the first Canadian male to hold three titles simultaneously: Canadian, North American and World title, without having won any of them previously.

1963 – Donald McPherson is the youngest male to win a world title.

1965 – Petra Burka performs first triple Salchow in competition at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Colorado Springs, USA.

1972 – Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Calgary.

1972 – Brian Pockar is the youngest male to compete at a Canadian Championships in senior at age 13.

1973 – Skate Canada introduced as a major international event first location Calgary.

1978 – Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Ottawa.

1978 – Vern Taylor performs first triple Axel in competition at the ISU World Figure Skating Championshipos in Ottawa, Ontario.

1979 – Brian Pockar is the first to perform a triple Salchow/double flip series in an international competition.

1981 – For the first time Canada hosts the ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships in London, Ontario.

1981 – National Team concept conceived

1984 – Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Ottawa.

1985 – The CFSA reconfirms its mandate to promote recreational and elite skating.

1986 – The CFSA adopts a new logo to reflect its continuing commitment to excellence.

1987 – Canada hosts the ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships in Kitchener, Ontario.

1988 – Kurt Browning performs first quad toe-loop in competition at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

1988 – Tracy Wilson and Robert McCall become Canada’s first ice dancers to medal at an Olympic Winter Games in Calgary, Alberta (bronze medal)

1990 – The last figures are skated in international competition at the 1990 World Championships in Halifax, Nova Scotia (last man David Liu, TPE; last lady Zelijka Cizmesija, YUG).

1990 – The Canadian Figure Skating Hall of Fame is established and the first members inducted in a ceremony at the CFSA’s annual meeting in Edmonton.

1990 – The CFSA implements framework for Skating Unlimited new pre-school and adult recreational programs.

1991 – The Junior National Team is created.

1991 – Elvis Stojko performs first quadruple combination jump (quad-toe/double toe) in competition at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Munich, Germany.

1992 – Canada hosts the World Junior Championships in Hull, Quebec.

1993 – Kurt Browning is the first Canadian man to win four world figure skating titles (1989, 1990, 1991, 1993).

1995 – Canada hosts its first-ever ISU-sanctioned international precision skating event, Precision Canada International in Toronto.

1996 – Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Edmonton, Alberta.

1997 – Canada hosts ISU Champions Series Final in Hamilton, Ontario.

1997 – Elvis Stojko performs first quadruple toe/triple toe loop combination in free program of the ISU Champions Series Final in Hamilton, Ontario.

1997 – Canada hosts 1998 ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships in Saint John, New Brunswick.

2000 – Canadian Figure Skating Association changes its name to Skate Canada.

2000 – Canada’s black ice finishes second at first ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships held in Minneapolis, USA.

2001 – Canada hosts the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Vancouver and introduces SKATEFEST a cultural festival celebrating skating.

2002 – Jamie Salé and David Pelletier win the gold medal in pair at the Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, Utah.

2003 – Shae-Lynn Bourne and Victor Kraatz win the first world gold ice dance medal for North America at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships in Washington, DC, USA.

2003 – Skate Canada hosts the ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships in Ottawa.

2006 – Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir are the first Canadians to win a gold medal in ice dancing at the ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships.

2009 – NEXXICE is the first North American team to win gold at the ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships in Zagreb, Croatia.

2010 – Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir are the first North Americans to win a gold medal in ice dance at the Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, B.C.

2010 – Current logo adopted.

2010 – Kevin Reynolds of Coquitlam, B.C. becomes the first to land two quadruple jumps in a men’s short program. He performed them at the 2010 Skate Canada International in Kingston, Ontario, landing a quad Salchow, triple toe combination and a quad toe.

TRUE SPORT

True SportSkate Canada is a proud supporter of True Sport!

True Sport is a Canadian organization that is working to ensure a positive, meaningful and enriching experience for all who participate in sport. Skate Canada has always striven to create a positive sport environment for its members built on the values of fairness, excellence, inclusion and fun. Skate Canada is proud to support the True Sport movement and the principles of True Sport:

  • Go for it
  • Keep it Fun
  • Play Fair
  • Stay Healthy
  • Respect Others
  • Give Back

For more information on True Sport and to become a supporter of the True Sport movement, visit www.truesportpur.ca.